Nominations for the CIAC award for best scientific paper are open!

Hello, everyone!  

Please see the attached announcement regarding the call for nominations for the CIAC award for best scientific paper.

Nominations will be accepted until March 11th and the awardee will be announced at the CIAC conference in April.

The CIAC 2018 Best Paper Award Winner!

The paper titled “Bathyal feasting: post-spawning squid as a source of carbon for deep-sea benthic communities” by Henk-Jan Hoving S. L. Bush, S. H. D. Haddock and B. H. Robison. 2017, has been awarded the CIAC 2018 Best Paper Award! Congratulations to Henk-Jan and his team for an insightful manuscript.

Full citation: Hoving HJT, Bush SL, Haddock SHD, Robison BH. 2017 Bathyal feasting: post-spawning squid as a source of carbon for deep-sea benthic communities. Proc. R. Soc. B 284: 20172096. http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2017.2096

CIAC 2018: Important Dates!

Hello, everyone!

A reminder of a couple of important dates as you plan for the conference in November!

Friday, July 6:  Earl bird registration deadline
Saturday, September 1:  Final registration deadline
Pre-Conference workshop registration:  Wednesday, August 1

Visit the CIAC conference website to register for workshops, conference, and field trips!  Also, under the “travel” tab is where you can find the link to book your stay at one of the two conference hotels, the Bayfront Hilton and the Hampton Inn and Suites (student housing).

https://www.ciac2018.com/

Looking forward to seeing everyone in November!
-Heather and the CIAC conference planning team

TONMOcon VII at MBL, April 6-8, 2018

tcon7

Bret Grasse (MBL) has been part of organizing a cephalopod conference to be held at the Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole on April 6-8th 2018. TONMOcon is held every two years and attracts a diverse assemblage of scientists, aquarists, hobbyists, and general cephalopod enthusiasts. It is derived from the TONMO (the octopus news magazine online) website, which is the most comprehensive cephalopod public forum that currently exists in the U.S. It’s a very informal and fun conference, presentations scheduled to last anywhere between 20-45 minutes. There may be a few presentation spots left, but your attendance is highly encouraged in any case, as there are lot of great talks. If you’re interested in attending and/or sharing your expertise by presenting at this conference, please contact Bret (bgrasse@mbl.edu) and the creator/conference organizer of TONMO Tony Morelli (tonmo@comcast.net). Hope to see you there!

Registration will be closing soon! Further details can be found at the conference page: https://www.tonmo.com/pages/tcon7/

Eye, Cephalopod by Ian Gleadall

The following article was originally written by Ian Gleadall for the CIAC newsletter, but was never published. Ian has generously provided the article to us to be posted here. It describes a reunion to celebrate Kyoji Tasaki that took place in 2014, and the contributions that he and several of his colleagues attending this dinner made to our current understanding of cephalopod vision.

Eye, Cephalopod

Ian Gleadall. Sendai, Japan, September, 2014

Recently, Yasuo Tsukahara arranged a small dinner party to celebrate the 90th birthday of Kyoji Tasaki, former Head of the 2nd Department of Physiology in the pure research wing of the Medical School at Tohoku University in Sendai. This group of people has not met together for many years and Yasuo reasoned that it would be better and happier to meet now rather than waiting around to meet at the funeral of the first one to succumb to Old Father Time.

On the 12th of July of this year, then, the group met together at a restaurant in downtown Sendai. The author of this account (Ian Gleadall) was also invited, as a former post-doc. who worked briefly in the 2nd Dept. of Physiology just before Kyoji Tasaki retired. The attendees included a number of former students and friends of Kyoji Tasaki, but among this group were 3 people (Tasaki himself, Hitoshi Suzuki and Yasuo Tsukahara) who have made significant contributions to the vision physiology of cephalopods, hence the playful paraphrasing of the well-known science fiction title “I, Robot.” This article provides a brief account of these researchers and their contributions, along with a mention of others who facilitated their research.

Continue reading “Eye, Cephalopod by Ian Gleadall”